Sister Cities Association of Salisbury / Wicomico County
Sister City
Fast Facts
SALISBURY, ENGLAND
Guildhall The Salisbury Guildhall is the primary meeting place for the Salisbury City Council. The building was completed in 1795 and has been the home of the City Council ever since. It has since been renovated several times, with a large courtroom being added in 1829. The Guildhall has been through its fair share of hardship with a bomb explosion in 1884. The elegant building with its grand interior was refurbished in 2011.

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Old Sarum Old Sarum is the earliest recorded settlement in Salisbury, England. Originally built in 400 B.C. to control trade paths, it would continue to remain occupied during the Roman period. The fort would eventually be taken by the Saxons in the 6th century to defend against Vikings. After also being occupied by the Normans, a royal palace would eventually be built for King Henry I. As the new town of Salisbury came into fruition, the grounds of Old Sarum were sold by Henry VIII in 1514. All that remains of Old Sarum today are a few ruins.

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Poultry_Cross The Poultry Cross is a landmark in Salisbury, England that is a relic from the 13th century and marks the site of the former Salisbury Markets. The cross is the only remaining one out of the four original market crosses that were built. The other crosses were the livestock cross, the cheese market cross, and a cross designated for the flourishing wool market. The original flying buttresses that supported the cross were removed in 1711. The cross still stands today, looming over the present day Salisbury market which is held on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

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Salisbury Cathedral is one of the major attractions of Salisbury, England. Construction for the cathedral began in 1220 after it was decided to relocate the Old Sarum Cathedral after deteriorating relations between the Clergy and the military. Completed in 1258 after 38 years of construction it is widely regarded as a leading example of early English Gothic architecture. The cathedral also holds the honor of having the tallest church spire in the UK, at 404 feet. The Cathedral still stands today and tours are given of the site where you can even view the interior of the spire.

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TARTU, ESTONIA
The Kissing Students Fountain is a main attraction in Tartu, Estonia. It was constructed in 1948, three years after World War 2. Since its construction, the fountain has become a very popular spot for newlyweds. Couples often visit the fountain for luck, and even go swimming in it. To commemorate its popularity among newly married couples, European artist Mati Karmin completed a sculpture of a man and a woman kissing to go on top.

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St. John's church is Tartu's oldest surviving church and is considered to be one of the city's main landmarks. Originating in the 14th century, St. John's most notable feature is the 1,000 terracotta figures that are located on both the inside and the outside. The church was wrecked in WWII and remained in very poor condition before being renovated and reopened in 2005. Today, the church remains a main tourist attraction in Tartu, and has regularly scheduled hours for public viewing.

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Tartu is home to Estonia's national university, The University of Tartu, which is the only classical university in the country and the most prestigious. Founded in 1632, the University has a long and fruitful history with 14,000 students currently enrolled. The official language of the University is Estonian, however, there are some classes taught in English as the university houses 1,300 foreign students.

Prepared by Justin Bell